Secondary Catalogue

Series: Crash Course Navigating Digital Information


Check Yourself with Lateral Reading

Check Yourself with Lateral Reading

Look to your left. Look to your right. Look at this video. Today, John Green is going to teach you how to read laterally, using multiple tabs in your browser to look stuff up and fact check as you read.
Click Restraint

Click Restraint

The architecture of the social internet itself tells us not to be patient - to load more tweets, to hit refresh for new posts, and to click the top search results. But just because information is new, or algorithmically determined to be most...Show More
Data and Infographics

Data and Infographics

Today, we're going to discuss how numbers, like statistics, and visual representations like charts and infographics can be used to help us better understand the world or profoundly deceive.
Evaluating Evidence

Evaluating Evidence

Today we’re going to focus on how to tell good evidence from bad evidence and maybe importantly, how to identify “Fine, but that doesn’t actually prove your point” evidence - the stuff that the Internet is built on.
Evaluating Photos and Videos

Evaluating Photos and Videos

With the amount of fake and doctored photos and videos out there, how can we know what to trust?
Introduction to Crash Course Navigating Digital Information

Introduction to Crash Course Navigating Digital Information

We love the internet! It's a wealth of information where we can learn about just about anything, but it's also kind of a pit of information that can be false or misleading. So, we're partnering with Mediawise and the Stanford History Education...Show More
Social Media

Social Media

Today, in our series finale, we're going to talk about the great white whale of navigating online information: your social media feed. Social media shapes both our online and offline behaviors from how we engage in communities and consume goods...Show More
The Facts about Fact Checking

The Facts about Fact Checking

We're off to fact checking school. This time, John Green is teaching you how to fact check like the pros
Using Wikipedia

Using Wikipedia

Let's talk about Wikipedia. Wikipedia is often maligned by teachers and twitter trolls alike as an unreliable source. And yes, it does sometimes have major errors and omissions, but Wikipedia is also the Internet's largest general reference work...Show More
Who Can You Trust?

Who Can You Trust?

In which John Green teaches you how to assess the sources of information you find on the internet. The growing suspicion of expertise is a growing problem on the internet, and it can be very difficult to figure out which sources are authoritative